I'm sorry

Here’s a Big Relationship Tip: Say “I’m Sorry”

W When was the last time you said, “I’m sorry”?

In relationships over the course of your life, you are either going to learn to apologize or learn to build walls.
Genesis 29-31 gives the account of Laban and Jacob. At the end of their relationship, Jacob explodes, telling Laban how much integrity he had in working for him. (See Genesis 31:36-42). When that was over, Laban had a perfect opportunity to apologize, to try to make things right. All it would have taken was a simple, ‘I’m sorry.” Laban didn’t do that. He never apologized to Jacob. Instead they came to an agreement that they would not kill each other. They built a sort of monument and promised each other they would not cross the line.

I have had to say I’m sorry to my wife, to my children, to my friends, to people with whom I serve in ministry. Each time, it took humility. But it’s just the right thing to do to please God and to have healthy relationships. As one pastor I respect much in a message about dealing with difficult people said, “As much as it depends upon you, strive to have a clear conscious.” When (not if) we wsorryrong others, be must be quick to apologize. Even if they tell you it’s not enough, even if they refuse to forgive, say, “I’m sorry.”

Otherwise, you’ll build a wall that will keep the person at a distance. Pretty soon, you’ll be alone and bitter.

Forgiveness and repentance brings freedom.

Is there anybody in your life right now that needs to hear you say, “I’m sorry?”